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Archive for the ‘Art’ Category

Art can be an intimidating business. It shouldn’t be because the purpose of art is primarily about pure delight for the eyes of the beholder but I do understand the home lovers’ dilemma when it comes to what to hang on your walls. In the back of most people’s minds, and I include in this even the most confident of us, is ‘what are other people going to make of the pictures on my walls?’. I’m not going to tackle the enormous subject of how to select your art here (although I am gearing up to this topic so watch this space) but what I am going to talk about now is the incredibly good news which is that, and I really mean this, how you present and hang your art is almost, indeed dare I say as important, as the art you choose.

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These lovely simple botanical drawings make a huge impact hung in a group and against the backdrop of Fired Earth’s delicious South Bank paint colour. The clever addition of the bench and cushions picks up the colours in the paintings and visually anchors the artwork.

 

When I hang art for clients, which is a task I love because it makes such a difference to how an interior looks, the first thing I ask them to do is to get all the art they have out (and this should incorporate everything – original paintings of worth or not, prints, framed posters, family pictures, sculpture, home-made craft projects and so on) so that we can look at it and discuss what they actually like and what they are less keen on but may have a good reason (or not) for keeping. In this exercise I am primarily interested in noting what their most loved pieces are which should be displayed in key areas (master bedroom, entrance hall, main living room – wherever a household spends time) and what is less loved but can find a home in a lesser used area of a house (cloakroom, guest bedroom, back entrance hall). Once we have had this frank conversation, which is not always easy, I then start to think about where to place artwork in the home.

It helps to bear in mind that artwork does not have to match an interior scheme, in fact I like a picture to bring something different and eye-catching to the look of a room, but it does have to look comfortable in the space, not overpowering everything else or being overwhelmed itself.

I often feel rather shame faced when I visit the fabulous Fitzwilliam Museum because I tend to head for the first floor galleries which I love and as I try hard to concentrate on the artwork I find my mind pondering exactly what colour the wall behind the great masterpiece is and examining the way the lighting has been achieved. I know I am supposed to be looking at the artwork, but actually it is the whole experience of those rooms that makes me love the galleries and whilst the rooms are certainly not pretending to be domestic interiors, I find the combination of the artwork with the rich background colours, the dark wood flooring, the lighting and the occasional pieces of furniture is what makes me very happy. The moral of the story is that an interior is a collage of many elements and if you get the balance right, the effect is glorious; out of balance and beautiful things suddenly can’t come to life in the way that you want them to.

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Putting a treasured painting in a master bedroom ensures it is regularly seen and enjoyed.

When you have got an idea of where you want your pictures to live, the art of hanging them well starts with checking the space around the piece – they need enough space to be seen and to shine on their own merit but also some reference to other furnishings or pictures. For example, a piece of furniture under a picture usually helps to visually anchor the artwork – you need to leave enough space between the furniture and the picture to allow some accessories on the surface, the picture should not hang so low that accessories obscure the picture and not so high that it is hanging in mid-air with no reference to the things below it at all. The best way to hang pictures is to get someone (one or more people depending on the size of the work) to hold the picture in place and then get them to go higher, lower, right a bit, left a bit until you find the place that the picture looks comfortable and hopefully before the holder’s arms start shaking and a row beings to brew. I generally find that pictures are hung too high – go as low as you dare and try to remember that being able to see the painting comfortably, even when you are sitting down, is also an important part of the exercise.

I cannot emphasise how important framing is and this decision includes whether to frame or not, as certainly not all artwork needs framing. Spend time, effort and money (as necessary) on making the absolute best of your artworks by considering how best to present them. A clever framer is a very good friend of the interior designer and I always make sure that I ask the advice of my framer as a starting point, who will generally consider the right approach to make the best of the picture, but then I may add an opinion on the look that we are creating in the interior. We tend to agree somewhere between the two which should ensure that the final approach adds to both the artwork and the interior.

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This very favourite painting is displayed in full view in a well used space

Moving pictures around is a surprisingly effective way of giving your home a bit of an update. I would like to say that I do this regularly but realistically it only really happens when I buy a new picture and move current ones around to accommodate it, but I am always surprised at the impact that a picture’s surroundings has on how the artwork itself is perceived. I recently acquired a lovely bright yellow velvet occasional chair which has found a very happy home in the corner of my bedroom. Interestingly three people who visit the house regularly asked, on completely separate occasions, whether the picture above it was new. In fact the picture has been there for quite a while and features quite a strong dash of yellow and I can only assume that the new chair combined with the painting draws the eye to the corner of the room more than before. Whatever it was, it is interesting that even a small change around can suddenly bring artwork, and it surroundings, to life.

Much as I love to see beautiful photography in an interior, which should be hung with the same consideration and principles as your other artwork, I also like to see personal photographs in a home as they so instantly individualise a space. These will probably not be the beautiful specimens that the great photographers produce and so need to be handled accordingly. Groups of photos (either in standing frames or wall hung) can be a good way to display images of family, holiday or a general hotchpotch of memories and should be thought of as an explosion of emotion, rather than a focus on one particular shot. A group of photos can also be added to and changed as life moves forward, which keeps your display up to date. Don’t feel you have to include every image, or record every event, or heaven forbid, have a photo of every family member (although you may have to swap pictures in on critical occasions so as not to cause a family dispute) – personal photos in your home are not an absolute record of your life, but an accessory that should lift your heart when you glance at them.

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This delightful tiny artwork is given a great presence by using a large mount with a simple frame and
being hung on a dark painted wall

Lighting is crucial for artwork (indeed for interiors generally and is a huge topic in itself). Think about what light you need for your artwork in daylight (which might still include artificial lighting) and what you need at night. You don’t have to only consider the traditional picture light – a light from the ceiling or a floor-standing uplighter can work really well too. Just as lighting art well is important for enjoying the work, shielding it from the sunlight is important for preservation purposes and should also be considered carefully.

Finally, I wish to joyfully dismiss the idea that you can’t hang pictures on wallpaper. You can and you should. Wallpaper is a splendid backdrop to your pictures, you will just need to be careful that the wallpaper doesn’t overpower the art either in terms of colour or pattern or both, it should be a backdrop so ensure that your art, not your wallpaper, is the star.

I have realised whilst I have been writing this piece that there really are a multitude of considerations when hanging artwork so what I say to you is don’t be overwhelmed by the task – get your picture hooks and hammer out and have a go. Unless you are wildly wrong, in which case you will have to get a pot of paint out, the new position for the picture will cover the first (and subsequent) hanging attempts and if you live with your efforts for a few days, you will soon know whether you got it right or not. I have rarely seen an interior that doesn’t benefit from having artwork on the walls so be brave and get those pictures hung.

This post appeared in the July edition of Cambridge Magazine

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This Sunday the clocks are going to be turning back an hour, meaning more light in the mornings and cozier, darker evenings. Since it’s all about the clocks this weekend, what better time to take a look at some of the beautiful and interesting clocks around at the moment? From big to small, there all sorts of lovely designs to suit your interior style.

Clocks are a handy buy as they do two jobs in one; they’re the perfect decorative piece to really make a wall pop, or to add focus to a table, plus they are also a functional piece for your interior and your life!

‘Marble Wall Watch’ from Rose & Grey

This square wall piece from Rose & Grey is the perfect unstated piece, if you’re looking for something clean and simple that will complement a relaxed design scheme, this is a great choice. The dark marble is completely on trend right now, and the square shape is an interesting alternative to the classic circle.

Following the marble trend, this hexagonal light marble wall clock from Trouva is a lovely sophisticated piece. It really stands out against a dark wall, and will look equally as gorgeous in a light and airy setting, it’s a great design for a contemporary setting!

‘Karlsson Light Marble Hexagonal Clock’ from Trouva

A clock doesn’t just have to tell the time, it can be a creative way to bring in some artwork or a feature piece to a room. This can be achieved by getting your hands on a bold and daring wall clock. This delicate sunflower clock from Chaplins is just wonderful. The metal petals are a lovely design and despite its flower motif, its design can be used in all sorts of schemes, not just a feminine one. The design can work in both a contemporary or bohemian interior, and even be used to jazz up a traditional setting.

‘Sunflower Wall Clock’ from Chaplins

If you love a wonderful vintage feel from your home accessories, this nautical style large wall clock from Graham & Green will do just the trick. I love the rusty, antiqued finish the clock has on it, it’ll look great up on a high wall against a pale background, or if you like a bit of organized chaos, mix it amongst some other wall pieces or art to create a wonderful cluster.

‘Nautical Compass Skeleton Wall Clock’ from Graham & Green

For something rather special, Rockett St George are currently stocking an amazing clock designed by George Nelson in 1957. The abstract eye design is perfect if you love to decorate your home with alternative and unusual items.

‘Eye Clock Designed by George Nelson 1957’ from Rockett St George

For something a little smaller, finding a clock for a table, be it sideboard or bedside table is a great time to experiment your style and begin to introduce a different feel to your interiors. This retro style alarm clock from Rockett St George will look fantastic in a contemporary and glamourous bedroom. The copper casing is beautiful, hopefully filling you with less dread when the alarm goes off in the morning!

‘Leff Amsterdam Block Alarm Clock’ form Rockett St George

If you’re looking for some ultra-antique glam, this Chinoiserie clock from Oka is a great little piece. The clock is fun and playful and will look great on an antique table, or if you want to mix up your styled pair with a contemporary piece of furniture.

‘Chinoiserie Carriage Clock’ from Oka

Rowen & Wren have something up their sleeve if you’re in the market for something a little quirky and unusual. The Ellmau chalet cuckoo clock could fit perfectly into a ski lodge look, or if you want to give your room an interesting focal point, contrasting this cuckoo clock against a contemporary or minimal scheme will create an interesting effect.

‘Ellmau Chalet Cuckoo Clock’ from Rowen & Wren

There is all sorts of fun to be had with picking out the perfect clock from your home, and with so much variety and choice out there you’ll have to resist the urge to put one on every wall in your house!

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The book featured in Book Club this month was brought to our attention by one of our lovely clients, and though it’s not the usual type of book we tend to include on the list, it’s a real thing of beauty! The Grammar of Ornament by Owen Jones is a detailed depiction of the history of decorative design and ornament. From Greek to Turkish to the Renaissance, the book is full to the brim of beautiful, traditional designs, and an interesting history on each origin. The collection of ornament designs are absolutely stunning, in fact this book is even worth buying to pull out and frame the images. I’ve selected a few of my favourites from some of the different eras to show off just how lovely they are.

Greek No.6

‘Greek Plate No.6’

This design comes from Greek and Etruscan (the name of civilisation in ancient Italy) vases. Something Owen Jones, the author of The Grammar of Ornament, notes about Greek decoration is that unlike some of its predecessors or companions at the time, its designs lacked meaning. Beautiful though they were, they weren’t representative or symbolic in any way, and were purely for decorative purposes. However, what is important to note is that there is an overwhelming amount of Greek ornament that still remains today, this indicates that at the time the style of Greek ornament would have been in popular demand and considered high on the taste scale. Jones comments that “the lands would have been overflowing with artists, whose hands and minds were so trained as to enable them to execute these beautiful ornaments with unerring truth”. Below the Greek plate shows off ornament from the Temples and Tombs in Greece and Sicily.

Greek No.8

‘Greek Plate No.8’

Ornamentation from Pompeii takes its influence from its surrounding areas, from Greek to Roman styles, the design below is a rather fantastic geometric ornament, taken from Mosaics from Pompeii. The rich dark colours mixed with the almost neon bright tones creates a somewhat contemporary design.

Pompeian No.2

‘Pompeian Plate No.3’

There is a certain vagueness that comes with the discussion of Byzantine ornament, it appears that historians are often unable to track down, or confirm authentic Byzantine pieces of design and therefore are unable to make a true, viable comment on the history of the ornament. Jones calls the Byzantine style “peculiar” but I think it’s rather wonderful, and the combination of various schools of design compile together to create a gorgeous style.

Byzantine No.3

‘Byzantine Plate No.3’

Of course, if you’re talking about decorative ornament, you can hardly leave out Turkish designs. From mosques, tombs and fountains in Constantinople, or modern day Istanbul, these intricate designs are truly something special, perhaps because they take influence from other styles of ornament, as Jones says, “on the same building side by side with ornaments derived from Arabian and Persian floral ornaments, we find debased Roman and Renaissance details”.

Turkish No.1

‘Turkish Plate No.1’

The Alhambra is a palace located in Granada, Andalusia, Spain, and is home to some wonderful examples of Moresque ornament. As Jones tells the reader, “we find in the Alhambra the speaking art of the Egyptians, the natural grace and refinement of the Greeks, the geometrical combinations of the Romans, the Byzantines, and the Arabs”. It’s this wonderful collection of influences that creates such glorious patterns and designs. The example below shows a diaper ornament, which is a repetitive geometric surface, usually composed of lozenges or squares, which this pattern uses.

Moresque No.4

‘Moresque Plate No. 4’

Persian No.1

‘Persian Plate No.1’

Above is Persian ornament taken from manuscripts that belong to the British Museum.

Jones describes medieval ornament as being in “perfect harmony” with the structural features of a building. Although little remains of medieval decorative interiors, the decoration of some manuscripts gives some indication as to what would have been the common and popular styles of the interiors. The design below shows off the conventional leaves and flowers from medieval style.

Medieval No.1

‘Medieval Plate No.1’

And finally, I thought I’d squeeze in a few more designs from the Renaissance and Italy. The Renaissance design comes from pottery ornamentation at the South Kensington Museum, which we now know as The V&A.

Renaissance No.5

 

‘Renaissance Plate No.5’

The Italian plate is pilasters and ornament from none other than the Vatican, specifically from the loggia, which were corridors, open on one side to the outside and covered in frescos, such as the one below.

Italian No.1

‘Italian Plate No.1’

Whether you want to learn about the history and stories of ornament, or just take a look at the glorious imagery The Grammar of Ornament is truly a fantastic book!

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Last week  I went to The Heong Gallery at Downing College in Cambridge to see the exhibition Cubes and Trees by the brilliant artist Ai Weiwei.  Although technically it’s not much to do with interior design, the exhibition was rather lovely and so we thought it deserved a blog!

Ai Weiwei is somewhat of a controversial artist, due to the subject matter of his work, which spoke out against the Chinese government, Ai Weiwei was arrested and imprisoned in 2011 for 81 days, and up until 2015 he was deprived of his passport. It is this that has led to a worldwide reaction and intrigue into his work, and since having his passport returned to him Ai Weiwei has exhibited his work in some of the world’s major museums, including a recent exhibition at the Royal Academy, which featured some of the same pieces available to see at The Heong Gallery.

Cubes and Trees is a simple, non-fussy exhibition that does exactly what it says on the tin, and the latter part of the title is by far my favourite piece. Comparatively, when I went to go see Ai Weiwei’s exhibition at the Royal Academy, it was a cold December morning and these beautiful trees where placed in the grand courtyard of the building. To see the piece then, in those circumstances created a looming, dramatic effect, but what a difference and change of location and season can make! Yesterday the sun was bright and shining, and the trees though still as equally dramatic had a serenity about them that created a very calm and peaceful encounter.

From afar the trees may appear ordinary, however as soon as you get a closer look you can see all of the wonderful details. Each tree is made up from multiple deconstructed trees, found in a market in Jingdezhen in China. The cut up branches and trunks and fixed together with nuts and bolts to create a beautiful, but raw appearance. What is so clever about this artwork, is that upon viewing it for the first time you may think that each piece is just a single tree cut up and put back together again, but in actual fact each final tree is created from several trees, all in different variety, shapes and sizes, each piece carefully crafted to fit together perfectly.

 

Ai Weiwei has commented on the piece, “We assembled them together to have all the details of a normal tree. At the same time, you’re not comfortable, there’s a strangeness there, an unfamiliar-ness. It’s just like trying to imagine what a tree was like”. The trees are interestingly placed in front of the neo-classical buildings of Downing College, which, like the deconstructed/reconstructed trees, and an interpretation of what its original counterpart would have looked like. Both the building and the trees are an imitation of something, and there is a wonderful synergy between them.

Inside the main area of the gallery, four one-metre square cubes are situated in a row taking up almost the entire length of the floor space. Each cube is made up for a different material, Crystal, Tea, Ebony and Wood.

The Crystal Cube, made in 2014, creates a distorted vision which is encouraged further by the placement of a mirrored surface place on the bottom. This helps to create the cube-like effect, it’s like you’re looking into a vat of solidified water.

The second cube in the sequence is made up of one ton of compressed Pu-er tea leaves, a traditional Chinese tea. As the room get warmer the aromatic fragrances of the tea become more and more potent.

The third cube is titled Cube in Ebony, made in 2009 from Zitan wood. Zitan wood, which grows in China is expensive, and it is often rare to find furniture made from it. In creating these cubes Ai Weiwei comments on Chinese culture’s traditions and customs. There is a perfect blend of modern geometric forms and traditional Chinese materials and decorative conventions. The last cube instalment is made from honey-toned Huali wood and is called Treasure Box. This piece is a little more interactive then the previous three, it is made with an excruciating amount of precision, and when dismantled it can turn into different forms of furniture. This piece is both a play on larger traditional Chinese furniture as well as Puzzle Boxes, which conceal their openings and can be used to hide things in for those in the know.

Cubes and Trees is a wonderful exhibition, full of eye-catching pieces with intriguing stories to tell of both the works and the artist, as the curator of The Heong Gallery Rachel Rose Smith confirms, “Both groups of works attest to the power of Ai’s use of forms, materials and places to reveal more about how we interact with our environments”. It’s a sure must of any Cambridge local to go and take a look at.

For more information on opening times, visit: http://www.dow.cam.ac.uk/index.php/heong-gallery

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Wood can be used in all sorts of unusual and exciting ways, from furniture, to art, to lighting there is all sorts of ways to play around with wood interiors. Wood has always been a homeowner’s best friend, and in the world of interior design, we are always finding new ways of using the material to create character and intrigue. I started to fall in love with wood interiors and discovered more and more how adaptable the material was, and how much fun you could have with it.

Tom Raffield is a fantastic company, located in Cornwall that specialises in creating finely crafted wooden delights. I particularly love some of their pendant designs, using nature as both a material and inspiration each design is crafted with care and thought to create contemporary wonders. The Scots Light by Tom Raffield takes its inspiration from the woodland surrounding their design studio, taking the form of a fallen pine cone and made from individual cuttings of wood. It’s a wonderful piece to help celebrate high ceilings and make a beautiful statement in the middle of a living room or hallway.

‘Scots Light’ from Tom Raffield

Another beautiful pendant from Tom Raffield’s collection is inspired this time from a butterfly in flight, its pendant uses its own shadow to enhance its design further, making it a delicate and elegant way to introduce wood into a contemporary interior.

‘Giant Butterfly Pendant’ from Tom Raffield

From the skies to the walls, decking out your walls in a wood motif is a great way to create some drama. Take this dark wood wallpaper for example, though it’s technically not real wood, it uses all the characteristics of wood, creating a dark and moody atmosphere. It’s a contemporary take on a traditional log cabin type style of interior and the burnt, black colour really gives it something extra.

‘Burnt Wood Wallpaper by Piet Hein Eek’ from Rockett St George

To incorporate wood onto your interior walls it needn’t be just by wood effect wallpaper, wall art such as this lovely piece from seller, ArtGlamourSligo from Etsy is an exciting and unique way to use wood in the home, and turning it into art is certainly a way to turn heads.

‘Fighting River’ from ArtGlamourSligo via Etsy

Unto This Last is beautiful London company that focuses their talents on creating wonderful, eclectic pieces of plywood furniture. They take an ultra-contemporary stance on design and create some spectacular pieces. This CD storage shelf is more of a work of art, creating a three dimensional, minimalist piece of furniture.

‘CD Round Shelving in White’ from Unto This Last

Another Avant Garde design from Unto This Last is the rather special skeletal-like chair with a fluid and wavy structure. This is the perfect chair if you’re looking to make a statement, use just as an occasional chair dotted in the corner of a room, or if you think your room (and you!) can handle it, go the full whack and get a set.

‘Spline Chair’ from Unto This Last

For a less dramatic, but equally beautiful wooden chair, this safari chair from Rockett St George is rather gorgeous. Great to pop around a dining room table or in a study, it’s an elegant piece with a hint of the exotic element.

‘Wood and Safari Chair’ from Rockett St George

If you want a lighter wooden touch in your interiors, perhaps something that isn’t permanent or as big of a statement, try going for a few lovely wooden accessories to kit out your home. These mango wooden plates from Holly’s House are rather adorable and an unusual form of tableware. They’re a great idea if you want to create a more natural vibe on your dining room table.

‘Mango Wood Plates’ from Holly’s House

Another interesting find from Etsy seller ArtGlamourSligo is this bespoke reclaimed wood headboards. If you enjoy the industrial look, or are in the mood for something with a robust, rustic edge, a piece like this headboard could be perfect.

‘Reclaimed Wood Headboard’ from ArtGlamourSligo via Etsy

If you love an item that has an interesting or exciting story or method of creation, take a look at these cardboard lanterns from Houselogy. Although there is a little debate on whether cardboard is technically wood, these lanterns are so lovely we had to step around the technicality! Their intricate design is created by combining layers of cardboard, the end results being a beautiful piece reminiscent of the moon. The individual layers and nature of cardboard material means that floods of light with come bursting out of each gap in the pendant, creating a gorgeous effect.

‘Graypants Moon Pendant’ from Houseology

There are hundreds of exciting and wonderful ways to get creative when incorporating wood into your home, and the possibilities can stretch for miles. Soon you’ll be turning your home into a beautiful woodland!

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Over the weekend I went to visit my friend in his new flat, a lovely space in the centre of town, but just missing a little something. He asked me what I thought was the best, least expensive way to create a home that actually feels like home, even when it’s rented. While you can’t always do a lot of permanent changes, there are small but effective accessories that you can buy that will not only fill up the space, but will make it feel more cosy and inviting.

Candles, cushions, rugs and other accessories are a lovely way to add some individuality to a space that doesn’t belong to you. They will automatically create a welcoming space, and are easy items to pack up if you move. I’ve picked out some cheap, but chic portable home accessories to help turn your house a home.

‘Cactus Candle’ from Graham and Green

Candles on the whole are an easy way to change a rooms lighting and atmosphere, building a collection of candles in all shapes and sizes will show off your individuality and character. This cactus candle is super stylish and a fun decorative piece to have in your home. Make it a focal point by surrounding it with simple, long stem candles.

If buying a designer set of table and chairs seems like something you’d rather not do, you can dress up your existing set in a few simple ways. Getting some cheap and cheery seat cushions will make a creative space out of an ordinary one, so will buying a tablecloth, they’re both an easy way to inject some personality into a rented house and will make the whole space feel homier. H&M Home have some rather fun, contemporary and reasonably priced low-key items that are perfect for a quick fix. I really like their range of seat cushions and tablecloths, plus they’re cheap enough that if you get them a little messy you don’t need to feel bad about it.

‘Selection of seat cushions’ and ‘Printed tablecloth’ from H&M Home

You can create a more settled-in feeling in a house by decorating the walls, it’s a great way to show off your style and taste without taking up too much space. I think this round copper mirror and Barker and Stonehouse is something special. The copper tones will help make a cold space warm, and will complement some leafy green plants. It can also be made to work with contemporary and bohemian style interiors.

‘Round copper wall mirror’ from Barker and Stonehouse

For something a little more alternative and intriguing, an interesting art piece like this wall trellis from Habitat is an inexpensive way to add some style to a plain wall. You could even get creative and begin to add you own personal touch to the piece by weaving in some fairy lights or fake foliage.

‘Trellis wall art’ from Habitat

Display photographs or postcards in an interesting way with these brass picture frames from Rockett St George. You could use one as focal point among some simpler frames or create a whole feature wall by using a few in different sizes.

‘Brass picture frame with chain’ from Rockett St George

Rugs are just a great solution to make any home feel more inviting for both style and practical reasons. Firstly they’ll help make the room feel warmer, and they’ll also help to reduce an echoing sounds. Style-wise they’re perfect to introduce some fun to your floors, especially if you don’t want to spend too much or you aren’t able to change the primary floor materials. I like these two simple but sweet rugs from Ikea that are ideal for making a blank canvas a little less blank.

‘Ristinge rug’ and ‘Sommar rug’ from Ikea

And finally, add a simple floor lamp, with a softly coloured bulb and turn a cold corner into a warm happy place. These Rutbo floor lamps from Ikea will work in all sorts of interior schemes, get two in the different sizes to create some diversity.

‘Retbo floor lamps’ from Ikea

From lamps to rugs, there are so many solutions to making a house feel like your own, and so much fun to be had in the process!

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It was always a popular opinion in my household that you could never have too many vases. Large ones, small ones, tall and stubby, wide and narrow, my mother’s collection of vases is rather impressive. Not only did this mean that my family home is constantly full of lovely flowers and plants, but it’s also full of beautiful vases to accompany them.

Now that the sun is shining away, and it’s finally starting to feel like spring, it’s time to give our homes that fresh spring makeover, and what better way to do so then by adding some amazingly designed vases and pots to your collection. Whether you have miles of space to play around with, or can just about squeeze a small pot in somewhere, walking into a room that has a beautiful plant or boutique and a decorative pot to match is always guaranteed to be a mood enhancer.

This Kali vase from Abigail Ahern really caught my eye, the aged dappled effect adds character. The pretty off-white ceramic colour will wonderfully complement some vivid green leaves overflowing from the top.

Kali Vase from Abigail Ahern

New from The White Company are these Mossed plant pots that come in a range of sizes. This look is created by coating the pots in yogurt and burying them in soil. The look has a rustic, urban feel about it and would look great with some tough, Mediterranean plants.

Mossed Plant Pot from The White Company

For more of a colourful touch, and something that would look fantastic even without flowers inside are these retro Mid-century Italian vases from Alfie’s Antique Market. They’re made to capture the attention of the room, and would make a superb statement grouped together on a side table or on top of a cabinet.

Carlo Moretti Vases from Alfie’s Antique Market

Interior Supply stock some super stylish contemporary pieces that never disappoint, including these intriguing deformed vases. It’s an interesting take on the classic glass vase that puts across a subtle yet distinctive look.

Glas Italia Transformer from Interior Supply

Not on the High Street have a wonderful collection of marbled cement pots that are a fantastic and inexpensive way to inject a dose of glamour into your interior. They’re the perfect solution if your porch, kitchen or conservatory is in need of a quick vamp, especially if you don’t want to break the bank!

Marbled Cement Mini Pots from Not on the High Street

Cactuses have been a hug trend over the past couple of years, filling up thousands of window sills and decorating an infinite amount of homes. From Abigail Ahern comes this interesting, cactus shaped vase that is perfect for all the cacti lovers out there! Pop a colourful flower or plant on top for a fun and modern feel.

Tall Cactus Vase from Abigail Ahern

Another mosey down the vintage lane to The Old Cinema, who always have a few hidden treasures within their midst, including this charming 1970s vase designed by potter Michael Cardew. I love the abstract striped effect and the almost diluting colours.

1972 Slipware Vase by Michael Cardew from The Old Cinema

If you’re into your sweet interiors, this adorable vase from Houseology is something to keep your eye on. The beautiful porcelain appears as if to be knitted, making a lovely effect.

Kinto Couture Knit Flower Vase from Houseology

For those who like to play around with historically classic decorative styles, this Chinoiserie-esque planter is something can be worked into dozens of different schemes, whether it’s to complement or to contrast, this piece could settle quite nicely into an interior or exterior of a home.

Chinoiserie Planter, Oka Direct

Fill your homes with bright and fun vases and wonderful florals and foliage to match!

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