Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Furniture’ Category

I thought this article might be appropriate for New Year’s Eve or for anyone contemplating Dry January. Happy New Year everyone!

 

Cate Burren of Angel and Blume Interior Design considers the art of the bar cart

I’ve recently been trying to cut back on my alcohol intake (not for any particular reason than the obvious ones, and it’s not going too badly thank you) and as with cutting back on anything, it does make you slightly obsessed with what you are trying to avoid. What I have particularly noticed is just how many references there are to our supposed love of a tipple in our modern world. Greetings cards seem to be particular offenders – it feels that every other card in the shop has a humorous, or otherwise, reference to celebrating almost any occasion with an elegant aperitif, or by getting completely hammered, depending on what section of the shop you find yourself in. Our interiors are not immune either. There is a sea of opportunity available to pronounce yourself a fan of an alcoholic beverage. I was recently in a largish department store where I saw, all in close vicinity, a money box with ‘Mummy’s Prosecco Fund’ written on the side, a cushion proclaiming ‘Champagne is the Answer’ and a framed poster which somewhat aggressively instructed its audience to ‘DRINK MORE GIN’.

Drinks trolley from Graham and Green

I am certainly not going to make a (mildly) reformed person’s judgement on the content of these declarations but it does strike me as odd that we don’t celebrate other forms of high living with quite such gusto. You don’t often see a fridge magnet for example that says ‘It’s Steak O’Clock!’ or a birthday card saying ‘Lobster Thermidor Makes Everything Better’.

Given our great love of a little drinky, we do seem to be surprisingly coy about how we house our habit. Wine racks and wine fridges are much more present in our houses than they used to be but other drinks are often still relegated to the back of a cupboard. I grant you that few of us want a Del Boy style bar in the corner of our living room but there can be something very glamourous about a selection of drinks, glasses and accessories that are well-displayed and ready for use.

I think drinks trolleys (or bar carts as the Americans call them) can be very good edition to a sitting room or other interior space as they make such a heartening display. Although they have wheels, they are not designed to be pushed round the room like you are serving on an intercity train although a quick trip to the dishwasher at the end of the evening (or the following morning if we are being honest) is quite handy. They are often rather marvellous pieces of furniture in themselves and look great when fully loaded up and ready to serve.

Cocktail cabinets are more discreet and can look very innocent from the outside. What you find inside can be anything from utilitarian to utterly fabulous. They often feature a rack for hanging glasses, mirrored back or sides, slots for your accessories and sometimes more – mini fridges, a pull-out serving ledge, lighting etc. David Linley, the master furniture maker has a ‘Techtonic Bar’ which is a piece of art as much as it is a piece of furniture and incorporates secret compartments (for your bootleg liquor) revolving columns and a cigar humidor. Its utterly beautiful and should be at a price tag of £130,000.

Gin glasses from Graham and Green

There are also some fantastic antique cocktail cabinets to be had and many of them have a least a whiff of lost days of high living. Unsurprisingly many of the really good ones have an Art Deco flavour about them and look great when either discreetly closed or party ready. I could be wrong about this but I personally think that no good can come from having a world globe that opens into a drinks cabinet but perhaps I am no fun.

Whatever style you prefer at home, it is hard to argue against a large, smart tray that quietly does the job of a drinks trolley or cabinet. This is not to serve the drinks but to keep all your beverage paraphernalia in order. A lovely tray, well curated, on top of a sideboard or occasional table works both functionally and aesthetically and is certainly a good place to start if you are initially dipping your toes into the home bar arena.

Whether you opt for a bespoke piece of furniture or a humble tray, the contents are key. Good glasses, an ice bucket, your desired bottles and mixers, condiments (citrus fruit, olives, tabasco sauce, cherries if you must) and other essential tools – ice tongs, cocktail shaker, cocktails sticks, swizzle sticks (come on, you know you want to) – can all play a part and there is lots of style choices available from grown up glamour right through to party lover.

I think it is important, both in terms of the look of your house but also for your own sanity to remember that you are not actually a bar, neither boutique hotel nor local boozer – you do not need to have every spirit, mixer, soft drink in the world to offer your guests. I think serving a drink or two that is appropriate for the time of year and day, that goes with the food you are going to serve, plus a quality non-alcoholic alternative or two, is perfect. Having a wide selection of dusty bottles, some with questionable sell-by dates, is a bit grim. After all, you select a meal for your guests rather than offering them a menu of choices (I hope) so why would you not do the same with the pre-dinner, and indeed during and post dinner, drinks.

And whilst we are talking about planning your drinking, quantity is as important as quality – sending your guests home plastered is not doing them, or you, any favours. Of course you want to have a great time and be a marvellous host/hostess but part of that is keeping an eye on the intake – serving four large G&Ts before feeding anyone will end badly. In addition, taking as much care over your Mocktails as you do over your Moscow Mules will encourage enjoyment over drunkenness. Lots of people don’t drink alcohol at all, or are restrained, and non-alcoholic drinks really can be delicious but it does take both effort and imagination.

So on that note, and before my best laid plans to drink less and behave better are too challenged, I would like to say it isn’t hard to glam up your drinks stash, so have fun, let your hair down and here’s to all our good health.

Read Full Post »

We’re always looking for creative ways to add interest into an interior, especially by using new and different design techniques. There are plenty of ways to add depth and texture to your interior, and one creative way to is to use carved and decorated pieces of furniture and accessories; from wood to metal. They are a popular style at the moment, with the patterns that these techniques create adding personality and texture into a room. I’ve picked some of my favourite pieces to share with you and give you an idea of how you could use the style in your home.

Starcarved Nightstand by Anthropologie

This simply shaped beside table from Anthropologie has been given a charming front design in a handcrafted star motif. If you don’t want your bedroom to be too busy; adding a smaller detailed aspect like this nightstand is a great way to insert some personality without being too distracting. The drawer and open shelf also give you lots of options for storage so that the top doesn’t get too cluttered.

Another beautiful piece of carved furniture is this sideboard from Loaf; the hexagon carved detailing at the front is an unusual style, making the piece feeling unique. If we were to think of carving details on furniture we might be tempted to think of rather traditional ornate designs, or the sometimes overdone oriental style, but these contemporary versions are a really fresh take on the technique. This piece would look elegant in a hallway or a modern dining space for storage.

Grand Orinoco from Loaf

Carved details are also fun to add to your accessories, like this wooden frame mirror from H&M Home. The white lines would really stand out on a dark painted wall; giving a contemporary look with a touch of bohemian style.

Mirror with a Wooden Frame from H&M Home

This etched detailed tray by the House Doctor, available at Amara, is a really subtle way to add in the carved style into your home. The brass tray is given an antiqued look from the etching; it would make a lovely feature on a dining of coffee table.

Carved Tray by House Doctor from Amara

A more natural interpretation of the grooved look is this driftwood headboard from Tikamoon. The uneven pieces are placed together to create a calming, relaxed design that still makes a strong statement. This piece would look lovely against a neutrally decorated room with a few extra textural details on the bed to make a soft bohemian style atmosphere.

River Driftwood Headboard from Tikamoon

This ceramic vase from H&M Home is a simple, contemporary way to include a carving detail into your interior. The asymmetrical top is an interesting element, making it a feature in a room even when empty.

Ceramic Vase from H&M Home

If you’re feeling a little more adventurous, a pair of this wooden spoons would make a lovely addition to the table as salad servers. The wings have a great flair of personality and as well a playful sense.

Hand Carved Wooden Spoon from Rockett St George

Seville Sideboard from Swoon Editions

Moving back to furniture, this sideboard has a fantastic two-toned pattern, creating a really graphic, retro effect. The groove detail is the perfect design to catch your eye whilst still working harmoniously amongst the rest of your belongings.

Carved Black Resin Box from Graham & Green

This box’s pattern gives it a real sense of style, and makes it the perfect focal point at a dressing table. A great place to keep jewellery or those little bits and bobs you can never seem to find a place for.

This plant pot is a lovely balance between a simple and intricate design; the stretched diamond shapes are a lovely feature; this would make a great piece for a little bit of decking or on a balcony of an apartment.

Round Diamond Embossed Plant Pot and Tray from Graham & Green

Carvings, grooves and etchings are a great way to add in some details and textures into an interior, giving it more character and personality without being too over the top. Whether you want to go big or small, it’s a chance to get creative and play around with different techniques.

Read Full Post »

Every now and then, the interior world goes through phases of using traditional philosophies or ideas and relating them to an interior aesthetic and style. A few years ago Hygge, a Danish word for cosiness, became a huge lifestyle trend as well as a leading theme for interior design. This year, there seems to be a new philosophy style that’s surfacing as the latest interior trend; wabi-sabi. Wabi-Sabi is a traditional Japanese philosophy that draws upon the acceptance and admiration of imperfections, simplicity and aged beauty. In interior design terms this supports the notion of using natural materials, with natural flaws and imperfections such as aging or signs of distress, or man-made items that adopt organic forms. Here are a few ideas on how to introduce wabi-sabi into your home.

Natural materials, such as linen, are already a popular choice in homes at the moment, and wabi-sabi opts for this fabric as well. To complete the look, keep the theme running with natural colours, and if you’re taking the full embrace of wabi-sabi on, a little crumpling of the sheets never hurt anyone! These rusty orange linens are just beautiful, creating a simple, natural statement out of your bed. For a similar look, try the H&M Home look below, or take a peek at The Linen Works for a whole range of simple colours.

Image from SF Girl Bay via Pinterest

Washed Linen Duvet Cover Set in Rust from H&M Home

The nature of wabi-sabi relies on embracing natural occurrences, such as lumps, bumps, ridges and cracks. Finding a way to incorporate organic materials, that haven’t had their natural composition interfered with, is a lovely way to introduce bigger elements into your interiors. This coffee table below is a raw edged slice of an old tree, revealing that bark and age lines and allowing these to be the feature of the piece. If you’re interested in your own live edge piece, there are many to be found on Etsy for your choosing, like this design from Konk Furniture.

Image from Planet Mag via Pinterest

Waney Edge Oak Dining Table from Konk Furniture

Take the idea of wabi-sabi to your lighting as well, avoid constricted, symmetrical designs and instead go for loose, soft fittings that give off an inherently relaxed theme. These free-form linen shades are a great example of a wabi-sabi conscious interior style, and they prove that a feature lighting piece doesn’t have to be overly designed or eccentric, but that you can in fact create a statement using just natural elements. You can learn to make these linen lampshades here, or for another idea, this delicate lampshade from Not on the High Street, also has a great wabi-sabi style to it.

Rustic Linen Lampshades from Remodelista via Pinterest

Nina Wire Pendant by Horsfall & Wright from Not on the High Street

Imperfect ceramic tableware is a way to easily get a little dose of wabi-sabi into your home. There was something of a heyday for perfectly coordinated table settings with immaculate precision and order, but now rustic charm has found its way into the grand scheme of things, and while we still want beautifully laid out tables for ourselves and our guests, there’s a little wiggle room for imperfect, uneven miscellaneous style. These plates below are a beautiful display of how raw materials are being used in stunning ways (and the collection they’re from is actually called the Wabi-Sabi Collection!) There is a strong trend for this type of ceramic design, so finding a favourite shouldn’t be hard; these bowls from Rockett St George are a good way to get started.

Wabi-Sabi Dinnerware Range from Made of Australia

Set of Four Earthenware Bowls from Rockett St George

A final idea for the inclusion of wabi-sabi in your home, using wild nature. Think less organised arrangements of flowers, and instead a wispy array of wold flowers and branches. I love the idea of collecting old thistles of branches over time to create a beautiful display; however if you can’t collect them yourselves, or want something that’ll last, a good quality faux branch will do the trick; like this willow twig from Neptune.

Image from Bauwerk via Pinterest

Willow Twig from Neptune

The wabi-sabi philosophy is a beautiful way of enjoying material things without being materialistic. Learning to appreciate the beauty in nature and bringing nature into your home offers a relaxing and simple environment; a peaceful foundation in which to add your own take on the style and story of wabi-sabi.

Read Full Post »

Creating a feeling of consistency throughout your home is a key part of designing any interior scheme. This can be done in all sorts of ways; through a particular style, a colour palette or even through a more focused feature such as the shape of your homeware and furniture. If you want to draw together rooms in your house, or even make one large space feel connected, take a look at how these circular pieces not only add style to your home but give it a subtle theme.

In a large seating area, create a connected look by using circular footstools. Whether it’s a large stool in the centre and a smaller ones flanking the sofa for a symmetrical look or, if you have the space, creating a beautiful feature in the centre of the area by placing the different sizes together, to create one multilevel piece. This big, round footstool from Swoon Editions in a glorious mustard velvet will add depth of colour and texture to a room, while being the perfect centre piece for a footstool feature. Next to it, a few of these little stools from Atkin & Thyme would look lovely.

Penfold Ottoman from Swoon Editions

Carnaby Footstool in Champagne Velvet from Atkin & Thyme

For a contrast in style, this legged stool from Graham & Green could add more diversity to the look, along with a Moroccan pattern.

Mina Printed Round Ottoman from Graham & Green

Getting the size of your rug right plays a huge hand in how a space or room feels, but if you have a large space to fill, finding a single rug to do the job can be an expensive and hard task. Alternatively opting to layer smaller rugs can be an interesting and resourceful way to work with your space. Layering and arranging round rugs can be a great way to gain a bigger rug and create a unique feature on your floor. These grey jute rugs from Bloomingville are a great foundation for a circular rug feature, a few of these with a central more flamboyant design, such as this botanical piece from Missoni Home would make a beautiful overall look.

Braided Jute Rug in Grey from Bloomingville via Amara

Botanica Round Rug from Missoni Home via Amara

For a smaller way to include a circular theme, using the shape in smaller details such as cabinet knobs throughout the house can create a simple, cohesive effect. Using knobs that are the same design, but with slightly different detailing keeps the look together but gives individuality to each space. For a modern look, these Enamel knobs from Bombay Duck are a fun way to add a spot of colour in your home as well.

Assorted Enamel Round Knobs from Bombay Duck

For a more traditional style, these knobs from Not on the High Street are created in the same vein but each have an individual look to them; they’d be great to use for different pieces in the same room, one style for the lower cabinets in a kitchen and one for the higher cabinets or on a dresser for example.

Aberca and Daroca Knobs from Not on the High Street

Finally, use circular mirrors to pull different room schemes together. If your rooms have different looks, link them by using the same or the same shape of mirror. Keeping some elements of each room the same means that there is still a connection between the spaces but each can have its own individual look. These round mirrors from Trouva are a perfect adaptable style.

Hare & Wilde Round Brass Mirrors from Trouva

Alternatively make a feature out of a long stretch of wall by combining different circular shaped mirrors. These tinted ones from Zara Home are a great modern style.

Toned Round Mirror from Zara Home

However you want to connect the rooms in your home, there are always endless ways to have a little fun with it and think up new ideas on how to make your home special to you.

Read Full Post »

Pantone’s Colour of the Year for 2018 is Ultra Violet, a punchy, vibrant purple. I’m always intrigued when the new colour is released each year and think of ways it could be used in interiors, not so that they fit with the latest trends, but so that they create an interesting and timeless look. As with all colours, there are endless hues and tones to be found in the purple spectrum, and so even if ultra-violet is not your go-to choice, there are an abundance purple pieces to lust over, that might be more your look. From big to small ideas, I’ve found some utterly gorgeous ways to include purple into your home, so take a look!

Lotus Wallpaper in Brinjal and Off-Black from Farrow & Ball

Farrow & Ball have recently released some reimagined wallpapers, using some favourite designs in new colours. A standout design is the Lotus in Brinjal with an Off-Black background. The two colours together creates a dreamy, romantic and dramatic look, perfect of spicing up a snug or dining room. It’s also a great way to use purple if you favour dark interiors and are looking to reinvent a room.

Curiousa & Curiousa have an outstanding collection of lighting, their beautiful glass pieces are sure to make a pinnacle feature in any room. This pendant is the perfect retro shade of aubergine, fitting in with its sixties lava lamp curves and shape. Great for making a combination of a cosy atmosphere and statement piece in a bedroom, or as an attention-grabbing light for the entrance hall.

Stemmed Orb Diffuser from Curiousa & Curiousa

Not all your purple additions need to be dark and dramatic, purple can also take a sweet and delicate tone. This bedding from Anthropologie is a dusty, faded shade of purple, the slightly darker toned trim is a sweet touch and could bring an inviting feel to a guest bedroom.

Caridee Bed Linen from Anthropologie

A touch of purple when it comes to your curtains could give a room that balance between calming and fresh; these pompom curtains from Urban Outfitters will help give a room a little lift. The Pompom detailing is oh-so-cute, giving the room some textural feel.

Blackout Pompom Curtains from Urban Outfitters

If you’re unsure about purple, adding it to your interiors in very small doses is a good way to see whether the colour is for you, and your home. A simple, elegant room with a small touch of purple here and there can make for an interesting look. This purple glass mirror from Amara is an unexpected find. A quick splash of colour in a downstairs loo, or mixed into a larger mirror display, this mirror could fit in perfectly.

Lust Mirror by Normann Copenhagen from Amara

Pair together this arrangement of purple headed thistle and this jellyfish paperweight for a lovely display on your desk or on a hall console table. The small additions of purple are fun but classic feeling.

Faux Purple Thistle Spray from Graham & Green

Purple Jellyfish Paperweight from Graham & Green

Adding purple to a garden or patio area isn’t something I would have automatically put together, but these chairs from Heals and the vivid green leaves make a great combination. An interesting way to give a rustic looking area a burst of contemporary colour.

Thayla Chair from Heals

There’s been a huge influx of purple furniture pieces and homeware this season, so it’s a great time to take a look at the colour and see if it’s to your liking; the great thing about searching through interior styles is that you never know if you’re about to fall in love with something new, and just maybe there’s a place for a little something purple amongst your favourites.

Read Full Post »

If you’re looking for a contemporary and interesting way to add texture into your home, leather may be a great solution. You might automatically think of an impressive chesterfield when the words leather and interior are placed together, but there are tons of different ways to introduce the material into your home; that can also accommodate various styles as well.

You may not think of leather as a suitable material for wall coverings, and perhaps the term bachelor pad comes to mind, but actually the more leather walls I see the more intrigued I am. I found this image on Pinterest of a fabulously swish and stylish living room with a portion of the double height wall covered in a classic brown leather wall panelling. It works perfectly with this cool bohemian style interior, and gives the room a huge dose of personality.

Leather Wall Panelling from Lush Home via Pinterest

If you’ve got the guts to go for leather, and have the right space to accommodate it, Elitis have a lovely wallpaper which comes in this rather interesting green-grey colour. In the image below they’ve paired the wallpaper with linen, which can be a good way to tone down and soften the leather making the space more liveable.

Anquille Big Croco Galuchat Wallpaper from Elitis available at Houseology

There are some interesting leather lighting designs floating around at the moment which are an unusual and eye-catching addition to a room. This wall light from Lostine would add distinct character to a mid-century styled office space. Contrasted against a mid-tone grey wall colour or going in with an extra oomph of retro style against a dark green colour, this leather light can be a subtle way to give a study some prominent presence.

Ava Wall Sconce by Lostine

Or combine leather with a bohemian style with some like this Pod shade from Who Did That; the woven design softens the material making it suitable for more relaxed style interiors.

Pod Noir Curve by Who Did That

Of course you can find some really wonderful pieces of furniture made from leather, both new and vintage, which are perfect for a timelessly styled interior. But if you’re looking for something a little rarer for your interior, you can find some creative leather gems around at the moment. This bedside table by Julian Chichester is a fantastic way to add texture and colour to a bedroom. The pop of colour will instantly become the main feature of the room.

Seago Bedside Table by Julian Chichester

If you’re looking for something more neutral to fit into a scheme, this faux ostrich leather coffee table from Arthur Lee will add glamour, while integrating into the existing palette but giving that interesting texture to the room.

Faux Ostrich Leather Coffee Table by Arthur Lee

The idea of a pommel horse in your house might be a little strange but it’s actually a great way to add leather into a scheme, and finding a beautiful vintage piece will give a room character. I like the idea of using a pommel as an alternative to a bench for dining room, or as a seating area in a hallway or boot room, or even as a feature in a bedroom or bathroom.

Vintage Pommel Horse Bench from Remodelista via Pinterest

If you want to introduce leather in a small way into your home, finding leather accessories can be a really innovative way to use the material. I love the alternative towel rack, with leather strap to hang it from the ceiling, really making a feature piece out of a practical element of your bathroom. Or the modern shelving with black leather straps, perfect for adding an interesting touch to a minimally styled room.

Hanging Towel Rail with Leather Straps from Heimatbaum via Pinterest

Two Tier Leather Strap Shelving Unit from Grattify

Give some more texture to a seating area with a patterned hair-on leather cushion; which could even be used against a classic leather sofa or armchair to give an exciting look.

Tutti & Co Panelled Leather Cushion from Trouva

Finally, give a room a modern twist on a clubhouse feel with this side table with leather magazine holder. The tobacco coloured leather and the brass body are a classic look, but contemporary design gives an alternative way of using the two materials.

Gatsby Side Table with Leather Magazine Holder from Rockett St George

Leather is a fun and creative material to use in your home, with a whole array of designs and styles that can facilitate it. From classic pieces of furniture to more alternative items, leather can be a great way to add a touch of excitement to your home.

Read Full Post »

More often than not, depending on our lifestyles, its common practice that most people need a little space in their home for a desk or a small home office area. Whether you’re studying, working from home, or have daily tasks to carry out, a desk is always a handy item in the house that you’ll always find a need for. Your workspace in an office may have to comply with its surrounding aesthetic, but at home you have the freedom to create your own individual space that works perfectly for you. From picking the desk, chair, accessories and the surrounding area, making your space your own is a lovely way to make productivity just that little bit easier.

Traditional Writing Desk from Coasters Furniture via Pinterest

When I think of a traditional writing desk I always picture something like this quaint piece above. A sweet style that’s perfect for a country themed interior. A desk like this with built in compartments is ideal if you don’t have a dedicated room as an office; instead of taking up precious space with larger storage you can neatly fit letters and envelopes, pens and documents in the drawers provided. It turns the desk into a design feature of a room, rather than something that’s in the way. I love this Repton writing desk from Oka, with a similar style in a wood finish; an elegant, design for a traditional setup.

Repton Writing Desk from Oka

Continue with the traditional theme with your desk accessories and lighting. This Charles Edwards table lamp has some wonderful detailing, but is simple enough to work with most traditional design, and will keep your area well-lit when working into the evening.

Palmer Table Lamp from Charles Edwards

For a few extra finishing touches, a piece like this letter rack by Alexander James available at Amara, has a traditional glamour to it, giving your desk style and a touch of personality.

Letter Rack from Alexander James at Amara

If you prefer a more contemporary style, there are many ways to create an interesting and productive workspace that’ll look sleek and stylish as well. This look below is clean and simple; the reinvented half white, half natural wood captain’s chair is a great way to rework a traditional piece.

Contemporary Writing Desk from Homes & Garden via Pinterest

This desk from Bluesuntree has the capacity for a bigger workload with a large surface and three handy drawers underneath, but its style isn’t compromised as it gives a modern, stylish but relaxed design.

Ellwood Desk from Bluesuntree

Pair it with a slightly more avant garde style of chair, like this legendary Masters Chair by Kartell available from Heal’s in a range of colours; but add a cushion to keep it comfy if you plan of being at your desk for a while.

Masters Chair by Kartell from Heal’s

You may mostly work from a laptop these days, but every now and then are in need of jotting down some notes by hand, so a trusty notebook and pen should never be too far. Keep your pens in a stylish home, in something like this holder made by Lexon; it’s sleek and cool, and will keep your desk feeling tidy.

Pencil Holder by Lexon at Amara

If you love retro style interiors, there’s no need to sacrifice this when it comes to your workspace, you can find good quality buys on places like eBay, or some new desks in a retro style if you like as well. This image below is a beautiful home workspace design; with the teak wood, retro desk legs and lots of greenery it makes a peaceful space to work in.

Retro Writing Desk from The Future Kept via Pinterest

For a similar style, this mid-century inspired Acorn desk from West Elm will help keep your retro aesthetic going in your workspace. Keep the look going with some retro framed prints, or an interesting collection of coffee table books nearby.

Mid Century Acorn Desk from West Elm

Give your space some refreshing plant life, and house them in a stylish planter like this one from La Redoute; it has some mid-century style to it, but could also be worked into another design scheme.

Florian Planters from La Redoute

Storage is always vital, especially with a workspace as it’ll keep all your paperwork tucked away and not scattered about the place, keeping you feeling organised. If you’ve got the space, a larger storage piece like this one from Oliver Bonas is a great way to keep your documents, books and other items at bay, while there’s also enough room to add some ornaments or plants to stop it from looking too much like work.

Grid Nine Shelf Storage Unit from Oliver Bonas

I love this relaxed, cosy style of this workspace; with the mismatching tables, sheepskin cushion and the lovely array of little bits and bobs scattered around. The bohemian style is fun to use in your workspace if you don’t need a large amount of space, needing the desk more for fun things then for work.

Bohemian Writing Desk from Apartment Therapy via Pinterest

This design from Maison du Monde is a chic design that have a wonderful cosy feeling to it, great for tucking in a corner somewhere, as well as dressing up or down with some interesting accessories.

Chinon Writing Desk from Maison du Monde

Keep the place feeling even cosier with a rug under the desk; something like this kilim rug from John Lewis, which makes a great bohemian base for your area, plus it’ll look good against some dark wood floor boards or if you want to add some faux sheepskin.

Fusion Kilim Rug from John Lewis

And for an extra bit of flair, something fun like these rabbit bookends are a playful touch to your writing desk, and a handy way to store books or papers.

Rabbit Bookends from Graham & Green

There are all kinds of ways you can create your own workspace at home, making it an inviting place that you look forward to using instead of a feeling of dread. Adding your own style and personality to your space will make it feel like a connected part of your home and not just an office!

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »