Posts Tagged ‘Advice’

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In this contemporary scheme, a comfortable statement sofa worked well to bring a relaxed feel to the room. Photography by Simon Whitmore

It’s weird thing that sofas are so hard to get right, but they really are. Furniture is generally easier to select than say redesigning a bathroom or commissioning joinery but over the years I have heard many sorry stories of profound disappointment on receipt of an eagerly awaited sofa. With this in mind, I often find myself using the 3am worry slot to agonise over an impending sofa delivery. However much I know that we have done exhaustive investigation, double-checking and confirming on behalf of, and involving, our clients in the run up to placing a sofa order, it is always a few hours prior to delivery that I decide that we have definitely overlooked something.

There are a lot of things to consider before buying (or commissioning, more on this later) a sofa. Firstly, you need to think about what style of sofa is going to work in your room – do you lean towards a contemporary or traditional feel, mid-century modern or shabby chic? You don’t need to put a name to the style you want but if you are unsure of what look you prefer then you are not ready to enter a sofa shop yet. Fabric choice is important too and hard to consider in isolation. Building up a picture of the final scheme including wall colour, flooring, other items of furniture, curtains or blinds and so on will help you to avoid a fabric choice that you find hard to match to or that is a bland disappointment. There is a raft of other decisions to also be considered and these crucially include size – a measure of the room with consideration to other items of furniture is vital – and comfort levels of which height of back, depth of seat, filling and how the sofa is constructed all play a role. There are lots more decisions that are important but I won’t go into all of these for fear that you may decide that your hand-me-down, battered sofa that you hated when you started reading is perfectly all right. However, I will say that it is better to consider a lot of these decisions prior to spending that nightmare Saturday morning trailing around high street furniture shops and ending up feeling overwhelmed by information, underwhelmed with what you have seen and temporarily less keen on the loved one that you left the house with that morning.

Can I also at this point, strongly steer you away from the idea that buying a cheap Ikea sofa with the plan to bin it in future and get the one you actually want is a sensible decision. This thought has been shared with me in my professional capacity more times than I care to remember and it is a notion that is riddled with flaws, the primary one being that all you are doing is delaying doing the work to get the right sofa and in the meantime putting up with a piece of furniture that isn’t right because you haven’t given proper consideration to what you do want (whether it ends up coming from our fine Swedish friends or not.)

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A traditional sofa in a plain fabric looks very happy in this country drawing room. Photography by Simon Whitmore

Once you have done your homework deciding which sofa is perfect for you, there is the possibility that you won’t be able to find what you want on the high street. Retailers are undoubtedly getting better at offering flexibility on size, fillings, legs, fabric and so on but I do find that we often have to commission a completely bespoke sofa in order to get what we want and this route is available to everyone. A good sofa maker is able to make or commission a frame to an agreed size, shape and style and then upholster it to your requirements which means that the world is your oyster. It also means that you are speaking directly to the expert, the person who is going to actually make it, so you should receive excellent advice. I know that you will be thinking that this all sounds very expensive and although it is not a bargain basement option, I always think it is less expensive than one would imagine, which is a reflection of not paying for a middle man and normally not paying for a swanky showroom and a glossy brochure. Although there are many excellent sofa makers all over the country, for historical reasons many are located in and around Nottingham which is where our ace upholsterer is based. There isn’t a chance that I will reveal his name but if you find a workshop with stressed looking craftsmen looking at an order and muttering ‘what on earth are they asking for now’, you may be in the right place.

What I will share with you are a few of my sofa related tips drawn from many years of professional sofa buying, some more painfully learnt than others, that I hope will help you in your quest to avoid sofa disaster:

  1. I’ve mentioned checking the size of the room but the other key measurement is the size of the doorway/staircase/sharp turn from corridor to room etc. A beautiful new sofa that won’t go into the room is not a pretty sight and if you think your proposed sofa won’t fit you may be able to have it delivered in pieces (removable legs or arms etc.) but you need to check that carefully.
  2. Don’t rule out the idea of an antique sofa that may or may not (if you are really lucky) need recovering. Often the frames (and sometimes the fillings) are well made and antique sofas can offer something a bit different. As an example, there is a company called Pelikan in Haverhill that buy original mid-century sofas from Denmark and restore and recover them. If your style leans in this direction, and you are in the market for a sofa, you should visit them immediately.
  3. Sofabeds are much better now than they used to be when neither the sofa nor the bed were all that comfortable. They are a good option if you are short of guest sleeping space but remember to consider how the room will function when it is transformed into a bedroom – do you have to move furniture in order to unfold the bed, where does bedding live, where do guests put their things? – often sofabeds are not used as beds because the room doesn’t really work as a bedroom, so it may be better to concentrate on sofa comfort rather than incorporating the bed facility.
  4. I hate hard and fast rules from interior designers because there is normally an exception but I am going to stick my neck out on scatter cushions made from the same fabric as the sofa. I genuinely can’t think of a situation where they are a good idea. The purpose of a scatter cushion (not back cushions or any cushion that is part of the sofa) is primarily decorative and small square cushions that blend into the sofa are apologetic at best.
  5. Lastly sales. Panic buying leads to mistakes. It is great to get a bargain but it is not a money saver if you immediately want to change it. There are many sales throughout the year and I guarantee that if you miss a sale bargain, there will be another tasty offer available sooner than you think.

Finally to anyone who has made a mistake with a sofa purchase, and my heart goes out to you if you have, don’t add to the problem by matching to the mistake. I have had customers say to me that they have a sofa they hate but for whatever reason it has to stay so we need to build a scheme round it. This is not a good plan. My approach would be to design a scheme that we love without considering the offending sofa, and implement it, which will hopefully dilute the impact of the mistake. We may add a few accessories that tie it into the scheme and then we wait for the day the right sofa can be put into the room and the sofa mistake can be found a new home somewhere that it is welcome.

This article first appeared the February edition of Cambridge Magazine 

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Rugs are a significant, but often overlooked part of any room or home. More than just an accessory, if used correctly, they can change a room’s style, atmosphere and overall vision. When buying a rug, people are often quick to jump to a safe option or to a style that they have used in the past, but being brave and taking a chance on a new style or size of rug can be just what a room needs for a little revamp and revitalisation.

Finding the perfect rug for your space and taste can be a little tricky as they come in all shapes and sizes, and like a pair of ill-fitting jeans the wrong match for you could be disastrous and could turn your beautiful home into a big old mess. But fear not, we’ve been doing a little research and we’re here to show you the best and brightest in all price ranges to help you to find you rug soul-mate.

‘Ivy Trellis’ by Rodarte from The Rug Company

If you’re out on the prowl for your dream rug it may be a good idea to take a look at some designer and high-end rugs to find out what styles, colours, patterns you are most drawn to (that is of course if you can manage not to shed a tear at some of the prices!) The best place to head to for some inspiration is The Rug Company, they are host to masses of beautiful rugs including collections from some of the best designers. A few of our dream rugs at Angel + Blume are designed by the house of Alexander McQueen, and though we might yelp at the price it’s good to have aspirations…

‘Military Brocade’ by Alexander McQueen from The Rug Company

‘Monarch Fire’ by Alexander McQueen from The Rug Company

Once you’ve established your likes and dislikes when it comes to rugs, you can start shopping around. Companies like Graham & Green are a great place to start as their selection is well stocked and their prices reasonable. This is a charming take on a Moroccan style rug, and could be easily worked into an already decorated room.

‘Atlas Berber’ from Graham and Green

If you’re looking for a small rug to allocate a space in a room for a few chairs and a table, or a comfy seating area, Graham and Green have some lovely circular rugs in a few styles, which are ideal for creating an individual space inside of a larger room.

‘Round Pink Rug’ from Graham and Green

‘Circular Goat Skin Rug’ from Graham and Green

There is always a pattern vs plain debate when it comes to picking out rugs, and ultimately it boils down to your taste and the room itself. If you want a plain rug it would be best to make sure you add colour or a pattern in another component of the room for example the walls or curtains so that the room doesn’t become too washed out. This elegant rug from Scottish designer Anta is the perfect plain rug to complement other styles and colours you may want to include.

‘Large Owl Rug’ from Anta

When a room is in need of a contemporary and quirky patterned rug, either to set the pace or follow suit, there are a few designers you can try. Jonathan Adler always brings a sense of fun and originality to his designs and has a wide range to complement your style.

‘Red Arthur Kilim Flat Weave Rug’ from Jonathan Alder

This enjoyable design from Adler is the perfect companion to a modern home, and can be the only splash of colour needed if you’re into more of a muted, minimalistic look elsewhere.

‘Zebra Peruvian Llama Flat Weave Rug’ from Jonathan Adler

If you like your interiors to have a playful edge, and you’re a sucker for a faux animal print, this zebra rug is simply to die for, especially since no animals did!

Stair runners are an amazing way of decorating a home, and one of the best place to go in search of runners is Alternative Flooring. They have a wonderful range of styles and colours, and can tailor their designs to your specific needs.

‘Wool Blocstripe Sable Bone Bloc’ from Alternative Flooring

This beautiful monochrome design will add a bit of pizazz to a neutral hallway and help create a welcoming atmosphere as well as a style statement upon entering your home. Another contemporary style from Alternative Flooring is the Rock ‘n’ Roll Roxanne design which would be perfect for updating a home’s interior into a modern look.

‘Rock ‘n’ Roll Roxanne’ from Alternative Flooring

When it comes to choosing a rug’s size, it’s generally best to follow the ‘bigger the better’ rule. If you buy a pre-made rug the standard size is usually around 300x200cm, although it will always vary depending on which store or website you visit. If you have a large space to play with, you’ll want to make sure that you don’t end up with a rug that’s too small and therefore disturbing the room’s ambience and flow. One way to get around this is to order a section of carpet and have the edges bound. This gives you flexibility on the size and can be quite cost effective. We did exactly that with a client with the brilliant Crucial Trader.

‘Audrey Sunrise’ from Crucial Trader

‘Krakow Rug’ from Niki Jones

Niki Jones creates some wonderful classic contemporary rugs, as well as cushions and linens, which can be custom made into any size you like.

‘Optical Rug’ from Niki Jones

‘Polygon Rug’ from Niki Jones

The possibilities are fairly endless when it comes to rugs, big or small, plain or patterned, classic or contemporary, expensive or cheap. Start thinking about what you would really love on your floor and then track down the right supplier, this will save you from being overwhelmed by choice!

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