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Posts Tagged ‘British Films’

For this Film Friday, I wanted to write about a sweet little film from 2013, directed by Richard Curtis, About Time. It follows the story of Tim, played by Domhnall Gleeson, a young man who learns he can time-travel back through his life. Though it as sci-fi element, it’s much more of a romantic-comedy than anything else, with endearing characters and beautiful sets. The film also stars Rachel McAdams and Bill Nighy, and if you’re ever in need of something to watch on a lazy Sunday, or a wintery evening, I recommend this feel-good, funny film.

The main house, Tim’s family home, is a stunning property in St Austell, Cornwall. Built in the early 19th Century, it’s a beautiful white exterior, with green-blue woodwork, with roses running up the walls, it shows off a very classic, elegant English style. I love the detailing that’s been added; the vibrant green metal benches are a lovely touch. By the front door, a faithful dog statue guarding the place, a rusty old ornate wall light and a pretty array of plants all make welcoming, lived-in touch.

The home is able to capture the quirkiness of the family, like their movie nights in the rain, projecting a film against the walls.

In inside of the home is just as lovely, and is perfectly decorated. There’s a thoughtfulness to the interiors that makes the house feel like any other home, with ornaments, artefacts, lamps and books piled around like ordered chaos. Liz Griffiths, the set decorator, did a great job creating a rhythm between rooms, and giving a timeline and history to the place; making it feel like the interiors had been naturally and unconsciously built up over time, rather than all at once.

I love the random assortment of bric-a-brac in this room, where often important conversions take place over fun games of table tennis. The trumpet in an old frame, dancing dog painting, old keyboard and a collection pots create a playful and relaxed homely style.

The hallway displays beautiful Georgian panelling. The panels are painted in a light blue, with a contrasting tomato red door at the end of the hall. Below Uncle D, played by Richard Cordery, sits in a mismatch of seventies curtains, turquoise walls, antique table and chairs and a wonky lampshade, that all just work together somehow.

As the story progresses, so do the interiors, and we see Tim move to London and in with his father’s playwright friend Harry, into a beautiful London home in Queen’s Park. It has the same cluttered sense that the family home does, full of artwork and books. I love this image of Tim sitting rather nervously against a bold red wall and posters.

There are some great touches to this house as well, this delicate wallpaper and the arched doorway of this bedroom are a sweet finish contrast to the pop art poster.

For that quintessential blustering English interiors, full of nostalgia, full of stuff, all perfectly in their rightful place, the home in About Time really hit the spot. Easily a reflection of the lovable characters the homes are charming and inviting, just like the film itself.

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